Picture Ohio! – The Lake View Cemetery

Lake near Wade Memorial, The Lake View Cemetery
Lake near Wade Memorial, The Lake View Cemetery

During early October I was invited to meet with two executives from The Lake View Cemetery in Cleveland to discuss holding an iPhone photography workshop there during 2016. We met over lunch in a historic building near Daffodil Hill, a tree-covered hillside where  hundreds of daffodils bloom in early spring. The 285-acre Lake View Cemetery is located about six miles from downtown Cleveland, just east of University Circle between Euclid Avenue and Mayfield Road. Over 108,000 people are buried at the Cemetery, which was founded in 1869 and modeled after the great garden cemeteries of Victorian England and France.

The President James A. Garfield Memorial at Sunrise
The President James A. Garfield Memorial at Sunrise

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The largest building at The Lake View Cemetery is the Garfield Memorial, which was designed by architect George Keller and built in 1890 to honor James A. Garfield, the 20th President of the United States. Caskets of the President and his wife, Lucretia, are displayed inside the  180-foot tall memorial, which stands on the highest point in Cuyahoga County and provides a spectacular view of Lake Erie and downtown Cleveland from the balcony, reached by a spiral staircase.

Cleveland from the Garfield Memorial in The Lake View Cemetery
Cleveland from the Garfield Memorial in The Lake View Cemetery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ceiling, Garfield Memorial
Ceiling, Garfield Memorial

Although I had visited The Lake View Cemetery during the 1990s, I had not explored it from a digital landscape photography perspective, least of all from an iPhone photographer’s viewpoint. The many big trees, including several that were as old as the city of Cleveland itself, founded in 1796, plus the hilly terrain, abundant fall color, and unique architecture provided a wealth of subject matter for photography, and I made several additional visits during October and early November. With the exception of the view of Cleveland from the Garfield Memorial, which was made with my Nikon D7200 and a 70-300mm lens, all of the images in this article were made with my iPhone 6, fine-tuned with Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop.

Tiffany Window, Wade Memorial Chapel
Tiffany Resurrection Window, Wade Memorial Chapel

The Wade Memorial Chapel, designed by architects Hubbell & Benes, was built in honor of Jeptha Wade, who founded the Western Union Telegraph Company and was the first president of the Lake View Cemetery Association. The Neoclassical temple, which stands between two lakes, was built in 1902, using granite from Barre, Vermont. The chapel’s most notable feature is its Art Nouveau interior by Louis Comfort Tiffany, including the resurrection window shown above, which is one of Tiffany’s most famous works.

Nearby is the 65-foot granite obelisk erected to honor John D. Rockefeller, financier, philanthropist, and founder of the Standard Oil Company. This 358,000 lb. spire is the largest memorial constructed from a single piece of granite in the United States.

Schofield Mausoleum, The Lake View Cemetery
Schofield Mausoleum, The Lake View Cemetery

More to my taste, from an architectural viewpoint, is the fanciful Gothic mausoleum that enshrines the remains of Levi T. Schofield (1842-1917), a Civil War veteran and architect who designed the Mansfield Reformatory, made famous as the setting for the movie The Shawshank Redemption.

Haserot Angel, The Lake View Cemetery
Haserot Angel, The Lake View Cemetery

The Lake View Cemetery is also home to scores of statues and markers. The most famous is the Haserot Angel, shown in the photo above. Sculpted in bronze by Herman Matzen, the 1923 Angel of Death Victorious rests on a large, pink granite throne at the grave of Francis Haserot, hands resting on an ornate torch, which denotes the ending of life. Black tears of discolored metal stream from the eyes of the angel.

Archangel Gabriel Sculpture, John Hay Memorial
Archangel Gabriel Sculpture, John Hay Memorial

Another impressive sculpture is that of the Archangel Gabriel, which stands atop the grave of John Hay (1839-1905), who was secretary to President Abraham Lincoln and U.S. Secretary of State in President William McKinley’s administration.

Moses Cleaveland Tulip Tree, The Lake View Cemetery
Moses Cleaveland Tulip Tree, The Lake View Cemetery

Two tulip trees, an American beech, and a white oak at the Cemetery are labeled as “Moses Cleaveland Tree”, indicating that they were alive when the city of Cleveland was founded in 1796.

Moses Cleaveland White Oak
Moses Cleaveland White Oak

In addition to many old and stately trees, The Lake View Cemetery is home to a large collection of Japanese maples, many of which were showing off their fall colors during my visits. My favorite photo of these diminutive trees with their dark, undulating branches and vivid fall foliage is shown below.

Grove of Japanese Maples, The Lake View Cemetery
Grove of Japanese Maples, The Lake View Cemetery
Euonymous Alatus foliage, The Lake View Cemetery
Euonymous Alatus foliage, The Lake View Cemetery

Equally colorful is the pink and deep red fall foliage of burning bush (Euonymous alatus), shown above.

Otis Monument, The Lake View Cemetery
Otis Monument, The Lake View Cemetery

The stature of a grieving lady holding a wreath shown in the photo above is kneeling at the grave of Charles A. Otis (1827-1905), a former mayor of Cleveland. The wreath symbolizes achievement and the eternal circle of life.

If you would like to view more photographs of The Lake View Cemetery, check out the book, The Lake View Cemetery: Photographs of Cleveland’s Historic Landmark, by Barney Taxel, with text by Laura Taxel, published by the University of Akron Press in 2014. I collaborated with Barney Taxel on another book, Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens. Barney devoted more than a decade to creating the 200 photographs that appear in this sumptuous book on The Lake View Cemetery.

Stay tuned for more information on our iPhone photography workshop at Lake View Cemetery in 2016. In the meantime, more information about The Lake View Cemetery is available here.

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

This Post Has 3 Comments

  1. Hi Ian, I am a new friend of Paula’s and she gave me your name through the Worthington Garden Club. My husband has been trying to reach out and get information on the Lakeview Trip. He is a photographer and a newly retired Firefighter Captain, Columbus. I am a newly retired schoolteacher and just moved down from the Chagrin Falls area so am familiar with the beautiful cemetery. Are you still planning on having the I- phone class? We are interested. Please let me know when it is to be. Thanks, Cynthia Heselden

  2. Extraordinary photographs. You capture Lake View’s spirit and majesty with artistic images that bring the cemetery alive. Bravo!

  3. My grandmother is buried there !! I’ve not visited her there in quite a while !!

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